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The attraction of Freemasonry

Prominent Freemasons

What they say about us

Historical highlights

Grand Lodge History

First Lodge meeting

The Cancer Car Program

Freemasons and religion

Responding to our critics



The Masonic family

Aims and relations

The "We can help" program
The attraction of Freemasonry
There are two questions that are often asked by freemasons and non-masons alike:
1. What attracts men to Freemasonry?
2. Once a man becomes a freemason what attracts him to become active and to devote so much time to its work?
There are probably as many answers to these questions as there are freemasons because there are so many facets to the organization, and its attractions so varied, that not all members have joined or become active for the same reason.
Nevertheless, there are certain basic tangible and intangible things which have made Freemasonry the largest and oldest fraternity, as well as the largest philanthropic organization, in the world. Freemasonry has existed because it supplies the answer to many human needs. Man is a social creature and many a non-member is attracted to Freemasonry by the close friendship that exists between its members.
That elusive tie that binds all masons together actually exists. Notice how often freemasons who have never met before immediately become friendly. This is no accident but the result of knowing that each was recommended to membership by a good man, was subjected to an investigation, has taken part in ceremonies that obligates them to high moral standards and has taken the responsibility to be a conscientious and honourable individual as well as to be charitable in thought, word and deed.
Another factor is the number of great men who have been members of the masonic fraternity in all ages. But the most important element that commands the attention of the public is the charitable work that is done by the freemasons and the masonic family. The masonic family disburses approximately three and a half million dollars a day to various charitable and research projects throughout the world.
The non-member is also attracted by the spirit of tolerance that exists in Freemasonry. The tenets of Freemasonry teach that every mason should espouse brotherly love, relief and truth. Brotherly love in the sense that all men are created equal; on this principle Freemasonry unites men of all nationalities and religious beliefs and conciliates true friendships amongst those who might otherwise remain at a perpetual distance.
Clearly Freemasonry is attractive to non-members for the many fine activities that are engaged in by its members as well as the quality of its membership. Freemasons spend time in working for the Craft because of its many personal satisfactions and the knowledge that Freemasonry does its part in making this a better world in which to live.


© 1871-2016 Grand Lodge of British Columbia and Yukon A.F. & A.M. Updated: March 16, 2001