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References to Freemasonry in popular culture range from the vitriolic to the innocuous. Far more often they are merely misinformed allusions from which Freemasonry faces a far more insidious threat; that of being marginalized, trivialized, and fictionalized. Most of the references noted on this site are harmless, simply pointing out that Freemasonry has played a role in our society; some are humorous, yet some are disturbing in their associations.
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Masonic references in
Millennium
The weekly tv series, Millennium ran for sixty-seven episodes over three seasons between 25 October 1996 and 21 May 1999. Unfortunately cancelled before the completion of its story arc, it begins with the recruitment of retired FBI profiler Frank Black (Lance Henriksen) by a shadowy group of ex-law enforcement people called the Millennium Group. Their logo, a detail of which is shown above, is the Worm Ouroboros, the eternal serpent representing both change and the eternal.
Denying that he has psychic abilities, Frank Black has the ability to "see what the killer sees", allowing him to solve crimes. [Episode 1.01] The Millennium Group is suggested to believe in Nostradamus, Revelations, and the destruction of the world. [Episode 1.01] The group is not mentioned directly again until season two when they are described as being old: "back to the beginning of Christianity—back to the beginning of the Millennium Group." [Episode 2.08] Frank also suggests that his ability, or faculty, has been "getting stronger on another plane" since he started working with the Millennium Group. [Episode 2.11]
Season one focuses on violent crimes, often involving serial killers, but hints at a deeper cause involving cosmic forces. In "Force Majeure" Frank describes a carving: "It’s the mark of lucifer. It’s an ancient symbol drawn as a sign of eternal loyalty" [00:22:49] This is patently a fictional depiction, although the creators are to commended for not incorporating a pentagram.
In season two the focus shifts to Frank’s relationship with the Millennium Group and his growing concern that their agenda may not coincide with his. He also discovers that there are two groups struggling to control the Millennium Group, the Owls, who believe in a secular millennial event involving physical cataclysm, and the Roosters who are more mystically inclined. Both groups have been battling a third, Nazi-inspired group called Odessa. [Episode 2.14] By the midpoint of season two, the Millennium Group is shown to be less interested in assisting police in solving unusual and violent crimes than in searching for such millennial icons as the true cross. [Episode 2.16]
It is in Episode 2.14 that the Millennium Group is revealed to be masonic:
Peter: "Past and future events we understand can only be known by a select few. In order to steer the world through the crisis that is inevitable."
Frank: "Steer? Or control?"
Peter: "Can you imagine the effect conclusive evidence of doomsday would have on a world in which, millions actually believe they've been abducted and experimented on by aliens with the knowledge and co-operation of government officials? A country that obsessed for decades on Elvis sightings? Roswell?"
Frank: "That stuff is just as ludicrous as asking me to believe a handful of people, a secret society controls the destiny of millions."
Peter, showing the USA Great Seal on the American dollar bill: "The image dates back to 15,000 BC. God, in the form of the Egyptian Amen-Ra. The "ever present eye." "ANNUIT COEPTIS:" "The king sees." Watching the acts of His people in life, so they can be judged in Death. This is a masonic seal. A secret society. "NOVUS ORDO SECLORUM:" "A new Secular order." A long-standing dream of Freemasonry. It was said of the men who signed the Declaration of Independence there were enough masons present to form a masonic lodge. And the Master of the Alexandria Lodge at the time... [Peter turns the dollar bill back round to display the image of George Washington.]
Frank: "It’s not enough. At least I have an idea of what those men were about, what they created. The fact is... I know nothing about the man standing in the darkness of my own house. And until I know more, I want nothing to do with the Millennium Group, or you."
The USA Great Seal is not masonic. "Annuit Coeptis" actually means "Providence favors our undertakings" while "Novus ordo seclorum" means "A new order of the ages" Seclorum is plural. Amen-Ra was often represented by a serpent, while Horus was represented by an all-seeing eye. And George Washington was elected Worshipful Master of Lodge No. 22, Alexandra, twelve years later in 1788. While Millennium is clearly a work of fiction, references like these only further entrench historical errors.
Further fictional history of the Millennium Group is revealed:
"Throughout history, the Millennium Group has had access to scientific breakthroughs, that were banned, or withheld, by those in power at the time. Copernicus. Galileo. The German physicists. This enabled the Group to leap generations ahead of mainstream research. Johnston’s claim... the Owls' claim, is: six billion years ago, before the formation of the Earth, two neutron stars collided six billion light years away. That collision released cosmic rays, particles of such extreme energy, that a collision of these particles could transform the vacuum of space and create... a tear in the fabric of our universe." [Episode 2.16]
"Tradition and our research confirms that descendants of the Merovingian Dynasty, the Family, whose job it is to protect the Holy Grail—bear this mark, like Ben Fisher. [tattoo of a bright, red cross] A thousand years ago, The Millennium Group and the Family shared a vision—over time that vision changed. Inevitably prompting a split between the two groups." [Episode 2.19]
By Episode 2.22, Frank’s disillusionment is complete: "The Millennium Group’s an illusion. Ceremonies and secrets that only certain members can understand? Collecting the Cross of the Crucifixion? Ancient text for future prophecies? It’s all a diversion. Sleight of hand. Distraction from the problems they're trying to control. This is not about the end of the world, it’s about controlling the world." He concludes: "The Group is not the solution, it’s the problem."
While there are no further mentions of Freemasonry, in Episode 2.16, when the "Old Man" is buried the Elder opens a wooden case and takes out a navigator’s compass which he drops into the grave. Possibly a masonic pun, it could also allude to cybernetics where the kubernetes is the steersman or pilot of society described by Plato.

Millennium. "Owls" Episode. 2.14 [MLM-214 (5C14)] Written by Glen Morgan and James Wong, directed by Thomas J. Wright, edited by George R. Potter (March 6, 1998). "Roosters" Episode 2.16 [MLM-216 (5C16)] Written by Glen Morgan and James Wong, directed by Thomas J. Wright, edited by Chris Willingham, (March 13, 1998). Lance Henriksen, Kristen Cloke, Megan Gallagher, Klea Scott, Brittany Tiplady, Bill Smitrovich, Terry O'Quinn, Robin Gammell.

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