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References to Freemasonry in popular culture range from the vitriolic to the innocuous. Far more often they are merely misinformed allusions from which Freemasonry faces a far more insidious threat; that of being marginalized, trivialized, and fictionalized. Most of the references noted on this site are harmless, simply pointing out that Freemasonry has played a role in our society; some are humorous, yet some are disturbing in their associations.
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Masonic references in Addie Pray
Long Boy pulled out his big old wallet that was always bulging with fake cards. "Why, looky heah, man," he said, "heah's mah Woodmen of the World card, mah burial insurance card, mah..." He stopped and looked at Mr. Hathaway, "You a Mason?"
Mr. Hathaway blinked a couple of times. Long Boy grabbed his hand and gave him the secret Masonic handshake he had learned somewhere.

Addie Pray, a novel, Joe David Brown. New York : Simon and Schuster [1971-06-01] hc. 313 p. 22 cm. ISBN: 0671209620. pp. 27-28. Cf. Paper Moon, 1973.

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